“Me and Joe” at the Jersey Shore

 

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I love the Jersey Shore. That’s why I moved to Red Bank on the Navesink at the top of it. But it wasn’t long before I discovered something that drove me crazy. No, it wasn’t the Jersey accent, it was the Jersey Shore was grammar. There was one consistent Jersey grammar error that everyone seemed to make–and no one seemed embarrassed when you pointed it out to them.

It went like this: “Me and Joe had dinner at Pazzo last night.”  Or “She joined he and me for dinner.” I even heard that kind of sentence from lawyers and politicians. 

 I wondered what had happened to grammar. Was this connected to driving down the Garden State Parkway and approached the Driscoll bridge? The big dividing line between Northern Jersey and the Shore?

That’s the lovely, sweeping bridge that goes over Raritan Bay. As you approach the wide, low arc of the bridge, the sky seems closer, the land seems wider, buildings fade from view, and calmness descends and starts to muffle all the traffic zooming over the bridge.

But once you sit down with friends in a restaurant, irritation returns. You start to hear phrases like, “Me and Joe had dinner at Pazzo last night” again.  And your heart breaks, especially because it’s so easy to fix. Just use this rule:  Put the sentence together using only one pronoun without the name of the second person: “Me went to dinner at Pazzo last night.” That sounds ridiculous. You’d never say that because”I” is the “subject” of that sentence. You’d always say “I went to dinner.” The word “me” is always used as the object of a sentence.  You can find the rule below.

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After thinking this over, you might say to your friends “Joe and I went to Pazzo last night for a great dinner.” That would earn you a grammar “A” and it would sound good. So if you live on the Jersey Shore try to think before you speak. Take the pronoun test before you pair a name and pronoun together. Then you’ll get it right and the Digital Diva happy. She will know one small corner of English language grammar has been rescued. She’ll be able to relax and go back to sipping her pinot noir and chatting with her pals at the next table. 

 


            RULES FOR PRONOUN SUBJECTS AND OBJECTS

SUBJECT…………VERB…………..OBJECT

I……………………………………..me  (1st person)

you………………………………….you  (2nd per.sing. & plr.)

he or she………………………….him or me (3rd per. sing.)

they…………………………………them   (3rd per. plr.)


 

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